George Floyd Cried Out

I thought I was handling the stresses brought about by the Coronavirus, the murder of George Floyd, the protest marches, and my memories of my past hurts and fears. Today, I tuned in to CNN’s show, “Coming Together: Standing up to Racism: A CNN/ Sesame Street Town Hall.” I listened to children ask questions about racism—what is it, why does it happen, how can you stop it, how should we treat each other, if I become a neurosurgeon, “can I operate on the brain’s of racists”and fix it—and questions from parents about how to talk to our children about racism and white privilege. I finally started crying.

Today, I have to admit that at 71 years old, I am still traumatized and in pain. Today, I am so sad that we are still being harmed by racism. Due to unequal access to healthcare throughout the years, Blacks are disproportionately affected by the Coronavirus. George Floyd, who tested positive for the Coronavirus, survived the illness; but he did not survive the economic impact of Coronavirus. He was laid off from his job as a club bouncer because all restaurants in Minnesota were shut down due to the virus. I doubt that the $1200 check generated by the CARES Act of 2020 did much to alleviate Mr. Floyd’s financial stresses.

Due to racism, Blacks are more likely to be treated harshly by police officers. George Floyd was murdered by police officers who responded to a merchant’s call complaining that a customer paid for items with a counterfeit $20 bill. Today, as I listened to the questions from the children on the CNN/Sesame Street program, I was overwhelmed by the vision of the police officer pressing down on George Floyd’s neck with his knee. George Floyd, as has often been the case for blacks in this country, was arrested, presumed guilty and executed on the spot. The children could not understand this. Neither could I. I could not stop crying.

I helped “integrate” a high school in 1965…I tried to educate white people in my work circle and social circles…I marched…I voted…I made phone calls for candidates…I gave my children the TALK…I tried to teach my children to live well in an unjust world…I tried to teach my children to love themselves and to know that they were created in the image of God. Yet, children called in today to the CNN/Sesame Street TownHall with questions about racism in the year 2020 in the United States. I could not stop crying.

As I listened to the children on the CNN/Sesame Street Town Hall, I thought back to the many years of struggle for survival of my ancestors, the struggle for equality, the struggle for success, the struggle for an education, the struggle to own one’s own body, the struggle to own one’s own children, the struggle to vote for those who pass and enforce laws that govern our lives, the struggle to be paid for the works of our hands, the struggle to patent and reap the financial rewards for our inventions, the struggle to fight for this country, the struggle for life, the struggle for liberty, the struggle to pursue happiness. I could not stop crying.

George Floyd cried out for his Mama. I am crying out for my ancestors. I am crying out for myself. I am crying out for my children. I am crying out for George Floyd.

#SELMA50 – A CALL TO UNITY

#Selma50 seems to have finally taken its rightful place in history. 
A bipartisan group of politicians and public officials,  including President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (Democrats), former President George Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush (Republicans), members of congress, Alabama Governor Bentley, and the late Governor George Wallace’s daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy   joined a mixed group of citizens to commemorate and honor the ordinary people who stepped up in an extraordinary manner to fight for full citizenship for African-Americans in the 1960s. 

Much like President Lincoln in his Gettysburg Address, President Barack Obama delivered a speech which will be referenced by future generations for its clarity and for providing a historical perspective of the events that took place on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama in 1965.     

While  honoring the Civil Rights fighters who were willing to give their lives in the battle for their right to vote, and the right of self-determination for future generations; President Obama noted that Americans of all races, religions and nationalities were moved to join the battle in Selma fifty years ago. The President, also, noted the universal appeal of the civil rights struggles of the 1960s. And, like Lincoln, President Obama ended his speech with a call for unity- referring to actions that “we” must take in the future. 

Yet, in the shadow of Ferguson, it remains to be seen if this president will be as successful as Lincoln in holding this wounded nation together.  
Click here: President Obama’s speech#Selma50

My Take On Robert S. Mueller III’s Testimony Before Congress

In Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, July 24, 2019, former special counsel Robert Mueller answered questions from the House Judiciary Committee and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence about the “Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election.”

Mr. Mueller, previously, stated that everything he had to say was in the written report. During the hearings, Mueller worked really hard to force Congress and the public to look to “The Report,” just as one refers to The Bible for truth–knowing that “not a jot, not a stroke of the pen” will change.

During the hearing, it was clear that Mueller does not have what it takes to be a minister–no dramatic flair. But, he continued to say, “read the bible.” So, his message was clear, but his sermon was dry.

The pages are not numbered consecutively in the original Mueller Report. This might have accounted for Mr. Mueller’s apparent difficulty in answering questions by referring the questioner back to the report. In my opinion, when Congressmen/women asked wordy questions where they quoted the report and referred to pages and paragraphs, they were trying to make Mueller look incompetent. It worked with most people.

I recommend everyone get their own personal copy of the bible, i.e. “The Mueller Report,” official title: “Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election.” I prefer my paper copy, “The Mueller Report Presented With Related Materials By The Washington Post.” The pages are numbered consecutively and the Volumes and Appendices are clearly indicated in the table of contents. The paper copy allows me to look up the facts at my leisure (I’m almost as old as Mueller; I might forget). Copies of the report are also available with commentary from Attorney Dershowitz. The paper copy costs about $9.00.

All in all, I offer my thanks and gratitude to Mr. Mueller and his team for continuing under difficult circumstances.

#SELMA50 – A CALL TO UNITY

#Selma50 seems to have finally taken its rightful place in history. 
A bipartisan group of politicians and public officials,  including President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama (Democrats), former President George Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush (Republicans), members of congress, Alabama Governor Bentley, and the late Governor George Wallace’s daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy   joined a mixed group of citizens to commemorate and honor the ordinary people who stepped up in an extraordinary manner to fight for full citizenship for African-Americans in the 1960s. 

Much like President Lincoln in his Gettysburg Address, President Barack Obama delivered a speech which will be referenced by future generations for its clarity and for providing a historical perspective of the events that took place on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama in 1965.     

While  honoring the Civil Rights fighters who were willing to give their lives in the battle for their right to vote, and the right of self-determination for future generations; President Obama noted that Americans of all races, religions and nationalities were moved to join the battle in Selma fifty years ago. The President, also, noted the universal appeal of the civil rights struggles of the 1960s. And, like Lincoln, President Obama ended his speech with a call for unity- referring to actions that “we” must take in the future. 

Yet, in the shadow of Ferguson, it remains to be seen if this president will be as successful as Lincoln in holding this wounded nation together.  
Click here: President Obama’s speech#Selma50

Stand With Bennett

I Confess: I am the product of an HBCU (Historically Black College or University), Bennett College for Women, Greensboro, North Carolina.

Bennett was an oasis for me — a place to refuel after spending my senior year of high school (1965-1966) with about 15 other African American students “integrating” Orange High School in Hillsborough, North Carolina during the county’s “Freedom of Choice” period. To understand what my year at Orange High School was like, all you need to know is that on Monday night, January 28, 2019, the community and school board finally admitted to racial intolerance and passed an equity policy (Bless their little hearts).

Bennett took me in, healed my broken spirit, let me know that I was in good company in my fight for equality and dignity, and prepared me to move forward as a positive force in the world.

Bennett College has a long history of educating, protecting, nurturing, polishing and sending women out into the larger world to reach their full potential and to be beacons in a, sometimes, dark and chaotic world.

Now, Bennett is facing a financial crisis that could end Bennett’s ability to continue to produce women of integrity who can make a difference in our communities, our country and our world.

Please take a few minutes to learn about my beloved alma mater, and, if you are able, please chip in and #StandWithBennett. Click the link below. Thank you.

https://youtu.be/uFHhKrWZaTI